Changing demands from healthcare system intensified the need for the adaption of improved & better services

The needs of our aging population’s healthcare are changing the demands on our healthcare system. Moreover, climbing rates of chronic disease intensify the need for adapting to deliver improved & and better outcomes in an innovative, collaborative manner.

There’s a need to strengthen the universal health care system of Canada. Which is why, on March 2017, the federal government of Canada committed $11bn over ten years in new federal investments for improving access to mental health & addiction services, in addition to home & community care across Canada.

On 16th April 2019, a bilateral agreement was signed between the Government of Manitoba & the Government of Canada to receive these funds for the home, community care, and mental health & addiction services. According to the agreement, Manitoba will be provided with around $182 million in targeted federal funding over 5 years for improving access to these services. This agreement will be renewed in 2021-2022 for the remaining 5 years. The ten-year commitment will be providing Manitoba with a $400M investment from the federal government for improving the health care services in the province.

This federal funding is anticipated to help increase the number of hours of services of nursing home care & home care attendant, & develop a community-based home care system which will help to avoid the hospitalizations & long-term care admissions.

If Canadians cannot afford to buy the needed medications then our health care system cannot function properly. Which is why, in June last year, we created an advisory council which has recently recommended options on a path forward on the implementation of national Pharmacare. Earlier to this report, our government announced the creation of a Canadian Drug Agency, a new national drug agency which will build on current provincial & territorial successes and take a coordinated approach for assessing effectiveness & negotiating prescription drug prices on behalf of Canadians.

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