New Smart Device Can Be Helpful For In-Flight Emergencies

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Aviation medicine specialists, physiologists, and technologists have worked together to develop ‘Aiber’ for in-flight medical emergencies.
  • Aiber can speed up the work of cabin crew during medical emergencies.

A multi-disciplinary team of aviation medicine specialists, physiologists, and technologists has developed a new wireless technology called ‘Aiber’ to provide support to cabin crew, pilots and clinicians on the ground. Aiber is applicable for a wide range of medical emergencies, that include (but are not limited to) burns, allergic reactions to potential heart attacks in the skies.

In a single year, flight diversions for medical reasons can delay 60 flights of just one major airline. This costs between £38,500 – £464,000 per diverted flight. Currently, four billion people travel by plane annually and by 2037, the figure is expected to rise to 8.2 billion.

Airber is can serve as big helping hand to cabin crew with regards to taking care patients in flight. Cabin crew are responsible for passenger care in-flight. They have to receive detailed and specific first aid training that is refreshed annually. Although some airlines can call on clinical ‘on the ground’ support, this is not mandatory for all flights. Calling the ground can also be difficult as it requires the crew to leave the patient’s side to use the on-board phone or existing headphone technology. This is prone to serious challenges like noise interference. Allowing real-time digital communication between the crew, the passenger and clinical support, Aiber can easily ‘live’ stream a wide range of passenger data to the ground.

Developing Aiber

Aiber has been developed with input from two of the world’s leading airlines. It is suitable for use by commercial airlines and business jets. The technology used in this device integrates wireless, clinical-grade, and heart sensing equipment. These equipment are specifically designed for non-medical professionals like cabin crew. Mime Technologies recently completed field trials with a global aviation company. Multiple commercial and business jet customers are still in the pipeline.

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