Opioid addiction treatment rising for all age groups except youngsters

Opioid addiction treatment rising for all age groups except youngsters

The treatment through medication approved by the FDA for opioid addiction is rising in individuals belonging to all age groups except youngsters, individuals aged between 15 and 24, in whom the use of the drug is declining, as discovered in an investigation of national data on the use of buprenorphine.

The results were published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

Mark Olfson, MD, MPH, the Elizabeth K. Dollard Professor of Psychiatry, Medicine, and Law at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the head of the research, stated how even though it is promising to witness a general rise in buprenorphine’s prescription rates, the data is implying how the youngest age group is finding it challenging to access this possibly life-saving treatment.

The research is the first of its kind to gauge national tendencies in the treatment of buprenorphine.

Throughout the research period, yearly buprenorphine use rates increased to twice their previous amount. They went from 2009’s 1.97 per 1,000 individuals, to 2018’s 4.43 per 1,000 individuals.

Even though the rise in use of buprenorphine was different for people belonging to different age groups, buprenorphine use fell by nearly 20% in the youngest age group, where it reached 1.40 from 1.76 per 1,000 individuals. Relative to older individuals, this age group also witnessed a decline in the strength of prescription and duration of treatment.

Mark Olfson stated how these discoveries for youngsters are especially worrying, seeing how their fall in buprenorphine treatment took place when there was a rise in opioid-linked overdose deaths for the same age group.

The researchers saw how even though the general rates for the use of buprenorphine are increasing, they are still fewer than national approximations of those having opioid use disorder.

 

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